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Climate-Sensitive Programming in International Security: An Analysis of UN Peacekeeping Operations and Special Political Missions

Author: Scartozzi, Cesare M.
Journal: International Peacekeeping
Vol. 29, no. 3
Pages: 488–521
Date: June 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/13533312.2022.2084387

Abstract: Over the past three decades, United Nations (UN) Peace Operations have become increasingly multidimensional and integrated. Blue helmets, originally deployed to provide security and enforce cease-fires, are now engaging in multi-domain activities aimed at sustaining long-term peace. As part of this trend, the UN Security Council has begun mandating Peacekeeping Operations (PKOs) and Special Political Missions (SPMs) to engage in climate-sensitive programming. Questions, however, remain over the effectiveness of climate-related activities in peace operations. This study, using a large textual dataset, provides a comprehensive assessment and evaluation of the state of climate-sensitive programming in PKOs and SPMs. The findings indicate that while mandates and programming activities related to climate change have been on the rise, most field operations have failed to integrate climate-sensitive programming into their work. Moreover, the agenda on climate security appears to have led to a process of institutional decoupling between organizational arrangements and field activities.
Keywords: UN, peacekeeping, peacebuilding, peace operations, climate change, climate-sensitive programming.

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How to Cite:
Chicago Manual of Style 17th ed.:
Scartozzi, Cesare M. “Climate-Sensitive Programming in International Security: An Analysis of UN Peacekeeping Operations and Special Political Missions.” International Peacekeeping 29, no. 3 (2022): 488–521. https://doi.org/10.1080/13533312.2022.2084387.
APA 7th ed.:
Scartozzi, C. M. (2022). Climate-Sensitive Programming in International Security: An Analysis of UN Peacekeeping Operations and Special Political Missions. International Peacekeeping, 29(3), 488–521. https://doi.org/10.1080/13533312.2022.2084387